Featured
New
Non-Fiction
The American Spirit, by David McCullough -
At a time of self-reflection in America following a bitter election campaign that has left the
country divided, David McCullough has collected some of his most important speeches in
a brief volume designed to identify important principles and characteristics that are
particularly American.
The American Spirit reminds us of core American values to which
we all subscribe, regardless of which region we live in, which political party we identify
with, or our ethnic background.
Apollo 8, by Jeffrey Kluger -
In August 1968, NASA made a bold decision: in just sixteen weeks, the United States
would launch humankind's first flight to the moon. Only the year before, three astronauts
had burned to death in their spacecraft, and since then the Apollo program had suffered
one setback after another. But when Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders were
summoned to a secret meeting and told of the dangerous mission, they instantly signed
on. Written with all the verve of the best narrative non-fiction,
Apollo 8 takes us from
Mission Control to the astronauts' homes, from the test labs to the lunch pad. The race
to prepare an untested rocket for an unprecedented journey paves the was for a
hair-raising adventure.
My Dad Had That Car, by Tad Burness -
With more than 1,300 pages and 12,500 illustrations covering 70 years, this may be the
most complete visual history of the American automobile ever published. Nowhere else
are there so many collector, luxury, sporting and ever day cars assembled with
fascinating information about original prices, engine sizes, horsepower, and other
specifications.
The Black Hand, by Stephen Talty -
Beginning in the summer of 1903, an insidious crime wave filled New York City, and
then the entire country, with fear. The children of Italian immigrants were kidnapped,
and dozens of innocent victims were gunned down. Bombs tore apart tenement
buildings. Judges, senators, Rockefellers, and society matrons were threatened with
gruesome deaths. The perpetrators seemed both omnipresent and invisible. Their only
calling card: the symbol of a black hand.  
Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, by
Neil DeGrasse Tyson -
What is the nature of time and space?
How do we fit within the universe?
Today, few of us have time to
contemplate the cosmos. So Tyson
brings the universe down to Earth
succinctly and clearly, in chapters
consumable anytime and anywhere in
your busy day.
The Crime Book, by Cathy Scott -
From Jack the Ripper to Jeffrey Dahmer, The Crime Book is a complete study of
international crime history that unpacks the shocking stories through infographics and
in-depth research that lays out every key fact and detail. Examine the science,
psychology, and sociology of criminal behavior, and read profiles of villains, victims,
and detectives. See each clue and follow the investigation from start to finish, and
study the police and detective work of each case.